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womens history


  • Actually, It's Doctor....

    by Suzanne Chod

    A recent editorial asking Dr. Jill Biden to stop using the honorific is steeped in sexism and nostalgia for the unchallenged authority of white men. Ironically, her upcoming public role may help to further break down such hierarchies.



  • The Hidden History of the First Black Women to Serve in the U.S. Navy

    The first cohort of Black women to serve in the US Navy were enlisted as reservists to fill shortages in the service's clerical workforce. At the time, the nation's climate of racism forced them to keep a low profile. A researcher compiling a book about the "Golden Fourteen" mined family history to learn about their service. 



  • Working With Death: The Experience of Feeling in the Archive

    by Ruth Lawlor

    A researcher of sexual assault against women by American troops in World War II confronted the problem that the archive captures only a traumatic event and leaves the human being affected in the shadows. 


  • Senator Mike Lee Disregards History While Claiming to Support American Unity

    by Matt Chumchal

    Senator Mike Lee this week claimed proposed museums dedicated to the history of women and Latino/as in America would foster division by ethnicity and sex. A biology professor shares an experience with the new National Museum of African American History and Culture and argues that the proposed museums are in fact needed to create the understanding needed to forge unity.



  • 50 Years On, the Feminist Press Is Radical and Relevant

    A look back at the ongoing work of the Feminist Press and the legacy of founder Florence Howe, who saved the work of many women authors from obscurity and helped support the emerging study of literature by women. 



  • Musing on Gender Integration in the Military with Simone de Beauvoir

    by Bill Bray

    For those engaged in the military gender integration debate today, de Beauvoir’s writing offers an additional reminder — those arguing against more integration may be no less intelligent and sincere than those championing change. But they still may be wrong.



  • Patsy Takemoto Mink Blazed The Trail For Kamala Harris – Not Susan B. Anthony

    by Judy Tzu-Chun Wu

    Patsy Takemoto Mink, elected in 1972 as the first woman of color in Congress, deserves recognition as a pioneering advocate for gender equity and the rights of Americans Caribbean and Pacific territories, and for preparing a path for Kamala Harris's election as Vice President.