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racism



  • Colorblindness Has Become A Conservative Shield For Racial Inequality

    by Frank J. Cirillo

    Beginning in the 1970s, white politicians selectively appropriated the dream of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. for a future post-race society by pretending it was already reality, rejecting further action to address racial inequality.



  • As College Football Grapples with the Coronavirus, it also Confronts its Racist History

    by Bennett Parten

    It's no coincidence that the south is the heartland of college football. The region first embraced the game as an expression of southern honor culture. While southern colleges were slow to adopt integrated rosters, today's Southeastern Conference teams rely heavily on the unpaid labor of Black players. 



  • The Problem with Asking Police to Enforce Public Health Measures

    by Emily Brooks

    World War II-era campaigns against prostitution in New York City show that enacting public health controls through the police department results in racially unequal enforcement and increased policing of communities of color. 



  • What Should We Do With Plantations?

    by Tiya Miles

    The lavish estates where Black people were enslaved usually whitewash their history. Here's how these places might begin to redeem themselves.



  • The Real Reason the American Economy Boomed After World War II

    by Jim Tankersley

    Citing recent economic research, the author argues that fighting employment discrimination and ending the idea that white men have a privileged claim on good jobs will be a potent engine for economic growth if and when America recovers from the pandemic. 



  • Is This the Beginning of the End of American Racism?

    by Ibram X. Kendi

    The slaveholders’ attempts to perpetuate their system backfired; in the years before the Civil War, the inhumanity and cruelty of enslavement became too blatant for northerners to ignore or deny.



  • Somebody Died, Babe: A Musical Coverup of Racism, Violence & Greed

    by Kevin Kehrberg & Jeffrey A. Keith

    The song "Swannanoa Tunnel" has been changed through generations of recordings by white musicians, concealing its origins as a song sung by Black convict-lease laborers who were forced to work in deadly conditions, often as punishment for minor crimes (or no crimes at all).