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memorials



  • A Black Nurse Saved Lives. Today She May Save Art

    Graduate student Laura Voisin George discovered an image of Biddy Mason, a Black woman born in slavery who became a founding figure in Los Angeles's African American history, in a set of WPA murals in an auditorium at the University of California-San Francisco. The discovery may help preserve the murals. 



  • Taking My Children to See Frederick Douglass

    by Clint Smith

    “It is always a fact of some importance to know where a man is born, if, indeed, it be important to know anything about him.” So wrote Frederick Douglass in his 1855 autobiography, My Bondage and My Freedom. It was with these reflections and Douglass’s words in mind that, on Juneteenth, I got in the car with my family and drove from our home, outside Washington, D.C., to Talbot County, Maryland, where Frederick Douglass was born.



  • Setting the Lost Cause on Fire

    by Karen L. Cox

    Once revered by their communities, the United Daughters of the Confederacy today are simply out of step with change sweeping the South and the nation.



  • Named For The Enemy

    by Ty Seidule

    "The military has perhaps the most diverse workforce in the country. That is something to be proud of. Yet we must ensure that no one who volunteers to protect America works in a place named for someone who committed treason to protect slavery."



  • New Statues Stoke Sensitivity Between South Korea, Japan

    A pair of new statues in South Korea of a man kneeling in front of a girl symbolizing a victim of sexual slavery by Japan's wartime military is the latest subject of diplomatic sensitivity between the countries, with Tokyo's government spokesperson questioning whether the male figure represents the Japanese prime minister.