;

Roundup



  • Pricks in Public: A Microhistory

    by Gillian Frank

    The recent controversy over a prominent writer's exposure on Zoom is part of a story of white men’s power to sexualize and control workplaces and public space through these same actions.



  • This 1841 Rebellion at Sea Freed More Than 100 Enslaved People

    by Clifton E. Sorrell & Daina Ramey Berry

    The rebellion of the enslaved on the Creole depended on the rebels escaping to the jurisdiction of the British and arguing that the British ban on the slave trade could legally seize the human property of Americans. 



  • Our Undemocratic Constitution

    by Julie C. Suk

    "We should not misconstrue the success of the midcentury Court: the few bright moments of inclusive constitutionalism, from Brown to Roe, did not make our Constitution inclusive and democratic."



  • Why Do We Think Learning About History Can Make Us Better?

    by Priya Satia

    While historians view their discipline as empirical and secular, its practice has typically enfolded a religious or quasi-religious effort to integrate human action and stories of moral necessity.



  • How to Steal an Election

    by How to Steal an Election

    Many of our election rules date from that moment, around 1900, when Americans redirected their “love of smart dealings” toward tightening up electoral systems, rather than finding ways around them.  



  • Sanctuary Unmasked: The First Time Los Angeles (Sort of) Became a City of Refuge

    by Paul A. Kramer

    Los Angeles’s first sanctuary law grew out of the refugee wave that had brought Alicia Rivera to the city. By 1982, an estimated 200,000 to 300,000 refugees from El Salvador — a country with fewer than 5,000,000 people — and tens of thousands of Guatemalans had fled to the United States to escape murder, poverty, and starvation.  



  • Amy Coney Barrett’s Judicial Philosophy Doesn’t Hold Up to Scrutiny

    by Angus King and Heather Cox Richardson

    "To put it bluntly, the whole premise of originalism is nonsense in that it pretends to make the work of the Supreme Court look straightforward and mechanical, like 'calling balls and strikes,' in Justice John Roberts’s famous phase."



  • Amy Coney Barrett’s Philosophy Has Far Worse Roots Than Most Americans Know

    by Simon Gilhooley

    At the core of originalism is a fundamentally conservative effort to limit the possibilities of our constitutional order to the imagination of historical figures from the 18th century, which included racial hierarchy and support for chattel slavery.



  • The Politics of White Anxiety

    by Jonathan M. Metzl

    Appeals to the fears and resentments of White voters are a predictable part of our politics. Why does it remain difficult to fight those appeals?



  • Don’t Reboot the 2016 Horror Show

    by Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw

    Avoiding the subject of the racist and sexist constraints on American politics ensures those limitations can derail democracy again. 



  • How Jimmy Carter Kept Me Sane

    by Jonathan Alter

    "I wrote my Carter biography during the toxic Trump years. The Georgian’s kindness and honesty are an inspiration for me and should be for America, too."